Best Snowboard – Reviews & Buying Guide
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Best Snowboard – Reviews & Buying Guide (November 2019)

Updated: January 8, 2019

Loaded Boards Algernon Snowboard

After 40 hours spent researching the best snowboards, we think Loaded Boards Algernon Snowboard is the best for most people.

This choice is based on several criteria: type, ability level, size, color, shape, flex, flex rate, core, sidecut, base, fiberglass, camber, mounting, weight, and warranty, among other things.

 ProductPriceOverall RatingQualityDurabilityAppearanceMaintenanceValue for Moneytypeability levelsizecolorshapeflexflex ratecoresidecutbasefiberglasscambermountingweightwarranty
Loaded Boards Algernon SnowboardLoaded Boards Algernon SnowboardCheck Price4.85.04.55.04.55.0All-mountainAdvanced / expert150 to 160Blue, bambooTwinTwinMedium / stiff Bamboo coreRadialSintered UHMWTriaxMustache2 x 410 lbs1 year
Burton Process Flying V SnowboardBurton Process Flying V SnowboardCheck Price4.65.04.54.54.05.0Freeride, freestyle, all-mountain Intermediate / advanced155 to 162Green, gray, blackTwinTwinSoft / medium FSC certified super fly II 700GModifiedSinteredSinteredTraditionalChannel12 lbs3 years
DC Mega SnowboardDC Mega SnowboardCheck Price4.55.04.54.54.04.5Freestyle, all-mountain Intermediate / advanced153 to 159Gray, blackTwinTwinMedium / stiff FSC certified stratus coreRadial SinteredBiaxLock & loaded2 x 410 lbs1 year
Burton Instigator SnowboardBurton Instigator SnowboardCheck Price4.34.54.04.04.54.5Freeride, all-mountain Beginner / intermediate 145 to 165Blue, red, blackDirectionalTwinSoftFSC certified super fly 800GRadial SinteredBiaxTraditionalChannel12 lbs3 years
Burton Clash SnowboardBurton Clash SnowboardCheck Price4.44.54.04.54.05.0Freeride, all-mountain Beginner / intermediate 145 to 164Blue, gray, blackDirectionalTwinSoftFSC certified super fly 800GRadialSinteredBiaxTraditionalChannel12 lbs3 years
Best Snowboard

Will finding the best snowboard put you on a par with Shaun White and Mark McMorris? Not likely, but it will help you perform to the best of your own ability.

There’s wide diversity in snowboards. Understanding their unique features helps you choose wisely.

Snowboard options are certainly a lot more complicated than sledding or using snowshoes. Beginner, intermediate, or expert? Powder, hardpack, tricks, or carving? Add in the challenge of finding snowboard boots, choosing a snowboard bag, and whether you need a snowboard wall mount, and you could feel overwhelmed!

Many snowboard-related accessories are interchangeable with those made for skiing – a ski backpack and good quality ski helmet will work for either sport. Ski goggles are mandatory eye protection for any winter sports, including snowboarding.

Ski gloves and a ski mask are great for keeping both skiers and boarders toasty. Ski pants work for either, although snowboarders prefer a looser fit. Ditto for a ski jacket. Pairing ski socks with winter boots gets you comfortably to a snow sports destination and back home.

But deciphering which are the best snowboard brands is challenging when you don’t know what to look for. Similar to ski equipment options (like cross-country skis versus backcountry skis versus all-mountain skis), try to identify the terrain and style of snowboarding you’re most interested in.

By identifying preferred styles of snowboarding, you have a starting point for selecting your board. Learning about the construction and shape of snowboards further pares down the list of models that will suit your preferences.

Selection Of The Best Snowboards

Here are the best snowboards for most people according to Outlinist:

Loaded Boards Algernon Snowboard

Loaded Boards Algernon Snowboard
(rated 4.8 / 5)
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A snowboard you can use on any part of the mountain makes more sense than buying multiple boards for different terrain.

Often, there’s a trade-off for that kind of versatility. But sometimes you get lucky and come across a true gem.

For those who are no longer beginners and have grown to love the feel of shredding fresh powder and the pleasure of carving, an all-mountain snowboard just makes sense.

You don’t want just any board however. You’re much more discerning than that.

A board that is built for all snow conditions is important but its performance and design matter a great deal too.

Information

The longer nose and extra inserts for a stance set further back on the board truly works for riding powder.

An all-mountain board is pretty popular because riders aren’t forced to stick to one kind of snow condition. If you’re bored on the groomed runs, you can head in search of powder. If no powder has fallen, you can find some ice to skid on. Designed for versatility, it’s fair to say that an all-mountain snowboard is the jack-of-all-trades. Good at everything, yet master of none.

Loaded Boards Algernon Snowboard begs to differ. It believes it can be the master of some things and pretty great at everything else.

Constructed from bamboo that runs throughout the entire board, the lack of sidewalls saves the rider from unnecessary weight and provides some surprising snap for a board its size. You’ll love how it pops with an ollie or bounces through a turn.

typeAll-mountain
ability levelAdvanced / expert
size150 to 160
colorBlue, bamboo
shapeTwin
flexTwin
flex rateMedium / stiff
coreBamboo core
sidecutRadial
baseSintered UHMW
fiberglassTriax
camberMustache
mounting2 x 4
weight10 lbs
warranty1 year

The shape is a directional twin. The longer nose and extra inserts for a stance set further back on the board truly works for riding powder. This board is one of the best powder snowboards secretly disguised as all-mountain.

Mixed with an early rise and extra camber, it has great edge hold and heightens your intuition on the mountain. The ride is smooth, snappy and fast. It eats up any and all terrain at high speeds while remaining stable.

With an awe-inspiring design that is beautiful and functional, the Algernon from Loaded Boards is not for beginners or those who like to cruise. Think of it as the ultimate work hard, play hard board. Whatever terrain you find yourself on, you won’t want to stop shredding it.

Pros

Aggressive bombs and rapids turns are what this board is all about.

Best for intermediate to advanced snowboarders who enjoy boards with a little more stiffness, the Algernon does it all, and does it well. If you are the best skier on the mountain, or think you are, you’ll want this board by your side.

  • All eyes are on you on the mountain: The Algernon is a piece of art. The stunning bamboo grain and cork footbeds, inlayed by hand, make the thought of custom snowboard skins laughable. With no exaggeration, this board is absolutely meant to be showed off! Get ready to turn heads.
  • Carving all day is a real possibility: Excellent edge control that digs into any snow unlucky enough to be in its way and a fast base make laying into a hard carving turns a blast. You’ll feel the spring of extra camber almost bounce you out of each turn.
  • Fast, fun and smile-inducing: Aggressive bombs and rapids turns are what this board is all about. Point the Algernon’s nose straight downhill and turn it loose. Quick when going edge to edge, it can turn quickly, even through ugly bumps, and slashes through chunder.
  • Titanic unsinkable in deep powder: There’s no chance of this board sinking in light fluff or the deepest powder; you’ll find it retains its ultra-responsiveness no matter what. Make sure you have the best freeride snowboard bindings to charge pow lines even harder.
  • Pop your way through the park! At first, you’ll be surprised at the pop this board has considering its size. This directional twin has the flex to manage some decent sized kickers, if you have the skill. Lap pipe all day or let it handle some metal rails.
  • Unique, smooth & stable ride: Super snappy! The bamboo core stabilizes and smooths your ride at all speeds, and the corked footbeds reduce vibration. Though on the stiff side, the footbeds also offer more forgiveness when landing than you would expect. Something your knees will surely appreciate.

Cons

The Algernon is not for beginners due to the stiffer flex of the board, and it’s not entirely forgiving to those with higher level skiers who are lacking in certain areas. Definitely not an easy ride. If you’re all about cruising, you’ll want to steer clear.

  • Anyone in the mood for a workout? If you aren’t into manhandling the mountain, find another board. The Algernon will punish relaxed skidding and relaxing, especially on ice. Already a bit heavier, you’ll need a legs-bent and fully-engaged attitude or you’ll be on your butt in no time.
  • No skidding and jibbing: You will get into trouble fast if you typically skid your turns. There is not enough rocker for you to let this board catch you slipping. Weak jibbers beware, your ego may take some hits because the flex is stiff.
  • Let’s not pretend this board is affordable: Definitely in the upper range for most people, the Algernon’s price tag will make your eyes pop as much as the springy camber will. Though this is not a cheap board, it is one of the top all-mountain snowboards and would last a long time.

Comparison

 

Loaded Boards Algernon SnowboardLoaded Boards Algernon Snowboard

Burton Process Flying V SnowboardBurton Process Flying V Snowboard

DC Mega SnowboardDC Mega Snowboard

PriceCheck PriceCheck PriceCheck Price
typeAll-mountainFreeride, freestyle, all-mountain Freestyle, all-mountain
ability levelAdvanced / expertIntermediate / advancedIntermediate / advanced
size150 to 160155 to 162153 to 159
colorBlue, bambooGreen, gray, blackGray, black
shapeTwinTwinTwin
flexTwinTwinTwin
flex rateMedium / stiff Soft / medium Medium / stiff
coreBamboo coreFSC certified super fly II 700GFSC certified stratus core
sidecutRadialModifiedRadial
baseSintered UHMWSinteredSintered
fiberglassTriaxSinteredBiax
camberMustacheTraditionalLock & loaded
mounting2 x 4Channel2 x 4
weight10 lbs12 lbs10 lbs
warranty1 year3 years1 year

Summary

The bamboo does its job, providing the perfect combination of dampness and responsiveness.

A gorgeous board that is so visually appealing you can easily forget it is meant to be grabbed and charged hard down the mountain. Once you strap in, the functional design provides one snappy ride, full of fast turns and solid edge hold that makes it one of the best carving snowboard.

The bamboo does its job, providing the perfect combination of dampness and responsiveness. Serious fun and serious work, you will really feel confident on Loaded Boards Algernon Snowboard on any terrain you can find on the mountain.

This snowboard hasn’t changed much over the years, if it has changed at all, but that’s because it is still one of the great all-mountain snowboards that only gets better with time.


Burton Process Flying V Snowboard

Burton Process Flying V Snowboard
(rated 4.6 / 5)
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About you for a moment – just to be sure you’re reading the right review.

First off you’re a guy who can ride a snowboard. You’re not new to this, and you know what you’re looking for.

You know if you want a board that is stiff or soft and you know what that means.

A true freestyle rider, you live to float on powder, skid turns, pop off jumps and jib on a board designed to perform.

So why aren’t you already riding the Process Flying V?

Information

The ride on the Flying V is soft, which means it will suit someone who is looking for something more playful than aggressive but will still offer you stability at higher speeds.

When it comes to snowboards for men, there are few better than the Burton Process Flying V Snowboard. They Flying V part of the name refers to the camber which almost looks like a gentle wave along the board. Ultimately, though, it is V-shaped coming to its lowest point right in the middle, so you get camber underfoot and play at the tips.

This is one of the best snowboards for intermediate riders. It is not for the beginner. If you’re just starting out, there are other boards which will give you a much better tine.

The ride on the Flying V is soft, which means it will suit someone who is looking for something more playful than aggressive but will still offer you stability at higher speeds.

typeFreeride, freestyle, all-mountain
ability levelIntermediate / advanced
size155 to 162
colorGreen, gray, black
shapeTwin
flexTwin
flex rateSoft / medium
coreFSC certified super fly II 700G
sidecutModified
baseSintered
fiberglassSintered
camberTraditional
mountingChannel
weight12 lbs
warranty3 years

Both its flex and shape are true twin – you can ride it in either direction and it is also perfectly symmetrical. No matter what you’re up for, you can jib, spin or butter as much as you like, and you will have cat-like stability no matter which way you point the thing.

The FS Certified Super Fly II 700G core is made of different natural woods to provide flex and stability and the length of the warranty (3 years) is a testament to just how durable this board is.

The toes and heels rest on wood which runs perpendicular to the rest of the board. This gives strength but does mean you will feel the ground and it’s recommended you do have lower body strength.

Pros

You can nose press and butter to your heart’s delight and the board will just follow you all the way.

Burton is a great brand and is known for all of their winter sports gear even if they are a little ubiquitous. Here are six features which make this board a bit special and make it stand out from the pack.

  • An all-mountain board even out of the park: Once you have the hang of the camber, there really is nowhere you can’t ride with the Flying V. No need to ride snowboards just in the park, you can take this board anywhere and it will respond.
  • 700g core is thicker under the bindings for pop and strength: The effect is a dynamic energy transfer downwards towards the snow. You will feel the bumps but will also get a great sense of the ride and you will need to drive it with a sense of play.
  • Has a great sense of innate fun: This board is perfect for someone who is used to riding a flat board or full reverse camber in order to handle the Flying V. It does go so far as to teeter-totter from tip to tip – you need to be in control.
  • If there is a top sweet spot it’s pressing and jibbing : This is really where the playfulness truly comes into its own. You can nose press and butter to your heart’s delight and the board will just follow you all the way. It is designed to be playful.
  • The base will almost drink wax and you know what that means: Well, it does mean that you must wax it, but it also means that it is going to be lightning fast when you do. Remember though, it is a soft ride, so make sure that your body is strong enough to handle it.
  • Shines on spins and has great jumping ability: Assuming you know how to land, the Flying V is fun on jumps. It tops out somewhere between 45 and 50 feet though it could handle more, this seems to be where it’s the most fun. But remember the V-shape – you need to be a solid lander.

Cons

What are the downsides of the Flying V? Well, there aren’t many. Burton has been in the market for a long time, and they know what they are doing. Here are three things which are worth remembering and checking out before you buy.

  • Speed and stability require some work to get used to: In the early days, until you’re really used to this board, go easy at speed. You may find it hard to stay stable. You will get used to it, so give it time and from then on the rewards are huge.
  • Working out the correct size is not the easiest: Unless you know your size it is best to get some advice. The snowboard’s sizing is complicated and working out wide or regular needs a degree. Talk to a pro if you need to, you don’t ever want to buy the wrong size.
  • Doesn’t come with a bag: This would be the last thing on most lists, but better to know beforehand. For the sake of being clear and avoiding any chance of disappointment, the Flying V snowboard does not come with a bag provided by Burton.

Comparison

 

Burton Process Flying V SnowboardBurton Process Flying V Snowboard

Loaded Boards Algernon SnowboardLoaded Boards Algernon Snowboard

DC Mega SnowboardDC Mega Snowboard

PriceCheck PriceCheck PriceCheck Price
typeFreeride, freestyle, all-mountain All-mountainFreestyle, all-mountain
ability levelIntermediate / advancedAdvanced / expertIntermediate / advanced
size155 to 162150 to 160153 to 159
colorGreen, gray, blackBlue, bambooGray, black
shapeTwinTwinTwin
flexTwinTwinTwin
flex rateSoft / medium Medium / stiff Medium / stiff
coreFSC certified super fly II 700GBamboo coreFSC certified stratus core
sidecutModifiedRadialRadial
baseSinteredSintered UHMWSintered
fiberglassSinteredTriaxBiax
camberTraditionalMustacheLock & loaded
mountingChannel2 x 42 x 4
weight12 lbs10 lbs10 lbs
warranty3 years1 year1 year

Summary

If jibbing and jumping is your thing, you really should take a look at this board.

The Burton Process Flying V Snowboard is a true twin snowboard in both shape and flex that’s better suited to the intermediate rider than the novice. The V-shaped camber which is almost like gentle waves through the board give a softer ride with plenty of play and lots of pop.

The board is capable of higher speeds – although until you’re used to it, you might find it a little unstable. Give it time, though, and you’ll get over it.

If jibbing and jumping is your thing, you really should take a look at this board. The combination of speed and camber are going to give you a lot of fun on the snow and it is comfortable right up to jumps of about 50 feet.


DC Mega Snowboard

DC Mega Snowboard
(rated 4.5 / 5)
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If you’re a beginner you can stop reading now because this snowboard for men is not the one for you.

This might be a best all-mountain snowboard but if you’re just setting out there’s just too much in this board.

So you know a thing or two about your sport, and you’ve got down where you like to go and what you want from a board.

The big question is which board is going to be the one to do it for you?

Maybe you’re looking for something by a snowboard graphic designer to be the envy of all in the park?

Information

The Mega features DC’s Stratus Core which uses Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified wood.

Is the DC Mega Snowboard the best snowboard for hardpack or the best park snowboard? Well here are the specs. This DC board is a flat stable platform for the intermediate to advanced snowboarder. And it does have good DC graphics.

You can pretty much do what you want with this snowboard, but right from the beginning know that you need to drive it or it will drive you and you will not like it. The ride is skate-inspired so expect it to move easily across the snow and be strong and responsive.

It comes in a wide version as well as the regular and lengths are 135- 159. The board has a Lock and Load Camber which means a traditional camber into flat right before the tip. With a flex rating of 7/10, it is going to have a stiff feeling with plenty of pop.

typeFreestyle, all-mountain
ability levelIntermediate / advanced
size153 to 159
colorGray, black
shapeTwin
flexTwin
flex rateMedium / stiff
coreFSC certified stratus core
sidecutRadial
baseSintered
fiberglassBiax
camberLock & loaded
mounting2 x 4
weight10 lbs
warranty1 year

The Mega features DC’s Stratus Core which uses Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified wood. It consists of smooth poplar for flex and, for strength, two stringers of beech running down the middle. The camber is a full 6mm so it feels like a true camber and is really poppy.

The board is a true twin by the way.

What does it all add up to? This board is a great on jumps. The flat surface before the upkick at the nose and tail give loads of lift in deep powder. The radius blend into the side cut so turning is effortless as you transition between the edges.

Pros

The beech wood is there for added strength but the poplar will bend and flex well enough, so that you can feel and drive it without it being too distracting or too hard to control.

What are the pros of the DC Mega? The difficulty is choosing where to start. This board really does have it all. There’s pop, speed and the need for skill. But here are six things that are really exemplary about it you should know.

  • This board will happily take you all over the mountain: This is a great all-mountain board, but you have to be the one to drive it. The camber profile returns energy back through the board so edge-to-edge the response is back to you. It wants to be ridden hard and fast. See? It’s not for newbies.
  • Responsive and playful – this thing always wants to jump: The design is a great stable platform and, if you’re up to it, you will find that it can handle any sized jump. You’ll get plenty of air and so you need to be able to land well and move immediately.
  • You’re going to love the unique design: Ok maybe unique is too strong, but the topsheet is made individually out of natural wood so DC doesn’t guarantee the color. It is also a contributor to the fresh poppy feel of a new skate deck – the envy of all the park.
  • Solid, steady feel of natural wood with biaxial laminates: This is a durable board. The beech wood is there for added strength but the poplar will bend and flex well enough, so that you can feel and drive it without it being too distracting or too hard to control.
  • Lock and load camber is traditional but spicy at the same time: Let’s face it – you’re doing this because you are an adrenalin junkie and the camber will give you a thrill ride without sacrificing anything when it comes to terrain. You’re all over the mountain; wherever you want to go
  • But with all of this, you can still predict the ride: This is a function of the Stratus Core. Once you’re used to riding it you’re going to be able to predict what is next and where to go with it. But remember, it is lightning fast – take care initially.

Cons

That all sounds really upbeat and positive, but there has to be some downsides. The DC Mega is a board off the beaten track. It is different from the everyday board and you should know that going in. Here are a few other things to know before buying it.

  • You are going to need bindings which are high-end too: This is not a snowboard with bindings and you will need to choose your bindings as carefully as your board. Don’t go low end, it is just going to ruin the ride, and it will not be because the board failed.
  • Really, this is NOT for beginners: Believe it. This board will ruin snowboarding for you if you are too inexperienced to ride it. You need to be a big guy who is the one in control. If you are, you’re going to love this magic snowboard.
  • This is a stiff board – and you’re going to feel it: Don’t underestimate it, this is going to have a stiff feel to it. So, make sure to measure properly and get the right length and width. Maybe even consider a few extra centimeters than normal if you like powder.

Comparison

 

DC Mega SnowboardDC Mega Snowboard

Loaded Boards Algernon SnowboardLoaded Boards Algernon Snowboard

Burton Process Flying V SnowboardBurton Process Flying V Snowboard

PriceCheck PriceCheck PriceCheck Price
typeFreestyle, all-mountain All-mountainFreeride, freestyle, all-mountain
ability levelIntermediate / advancedAdvanced / expertIntermediate / advanced
size153 to 159150 to 160155 to 162
colorGray, blackBlue, bambooGreen, gray, black
shapeTwinTwinTwin
flexTwinTwinTwin
flex rateMedium / stiff Medium / stiff Soft / medium
coreFSC certified stratus coreBamboo coreFSC certified super fly II 700G
sidecutRadial RadialModified
baseSinteredSintered UHMWSintered
fiberglassBiaxTriaxSintered
camberLock & loadedMustacheTraditional
mounting2 x 42 x 4Channel
weight10 lbs10 lbs12 lbs
warranty1 year1 year3 years

Summary

The DC Mega’s real positive is that for the experienced rider it is both stable, so good on jumps, but gives you plenty back allowing you to really go for it.

The DC Mega Snowboard is a lock and load camber snowboard for intermediate to advanced riders. It is an all-mountain board and will go wherever you’re capable of taking it.

This is a strong board with a flex rating of 7/10 which makes it very poppy and responsive. It is a true twin board with a traditional flat before the upkick which allows it to feel loose while giving it a playful feel at the same time.

The DC Mega’s real positive is that for the experienced rider it is both stable, so good on jumps, but gives you plenty back allowing you to really go for it. It is built for big guys with heft and control who know what they want back.


Burton Instigator Snowboard

Burton Instigator Snowboard
(rated 4.3 / 5)
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Snowboards come in so many different shapes and sizes, which can make choosing the ideal model difficult.

The type you buy depends on your riding style, preferences and your skill level.

Some boards are perfect for advanced users, as they provide the necessary platform for high performance stunts.

But beginners may have a hard time controlling such boards. It is why investing in a beginner snowboard is so important.

While you can rent a snowboard at some facilities, having your own board makes a huge difference when you are learning the sport.

Information

Burton designed the Instigator to provide a catch-free ride, where the snowboarder has to learn edge-to-edge control without the fear of wiping out every time.

Having a reliable beginner snowboard that makes it easier to learn the sport can make all the difference when you are first getting interested in the sport.

If you have already been snowboarding a couple times and had a good experience, it may be time for you to invest in your own board. Then you can begin to learn on a single board, which makes for a more comfortable and familiar experience.

The Burton Instigator Snowboard is among the best beginner models on the market today. It is a beautiful board that has the type of aesthetic that would be appealing to riders of various ages.

typeFreeride, all-mountain
ability levelBeginner / intermediate
size145 to 165
colorBlue, red, black
shapeDirectional
flexTwin
flex rateSoft
coreFSC certified super fly 800G
sidecutRadial
baseSintered
fiberglassBiax
camberTraditional
mountingChannel
weight12 lbs
warranty3 years

Burton designed the Instigator to provide a catch-free ride, where the snowboarder has to learn edge-to-edge control without the fear of wiping out every time. The board features a cruise control edge tune, while it is slightly tapered to ensure that it is pointed in the right direction on the slopes.

In terms of flex, stability and turning ease, the board is one of the best. These features mean that it is great for beginners, while it is also among the best intermediate all-mountain snowboard options available today. But it is too much flex for most advanced users, especially those who are riding on big mountains.

It is possible to purchase the Instigator in a number of different sizes. When it comes to choosing between snowboard sizes, a person’s weight is a very important factor.

Pros

Boards come in many different shapes, with the flat top being the ideal model for beginner to intermediate riders.

As one of the best beginner snowboards on the market, Burton’s Instigator is a tremendous option for any enthusiast who is getting into the sport for the first time. Here are its six best features.

  • Has a cruise control convex base: The special edge tuning from Burton ensures the snowboard is easier to control, making the learning curve a lot smaller for beginners. If you want a board to help you learn faster, the Instigator is the ideal choice.
  • Includes a 5mm taper: The taper in a board is the difference in width between the board’s tip and tail. With a 5mm taper, the Instigator makes it easier to apply weight to the front of the board. It also means turning is easier to control, keeping you pointed in the right direction.
  • Made with a flat top profile: Boards come in many different shapes, with the flat top being the ideal model for beginner to intermediate riders. It is flat for its running length, with some rise at the tip and tail. It offers the necessary stability, while making it easier to turn.
  • Features Biax fiberglass: Thanks to the Biax fiberglass, there is a very snappy flex when you are out on the slopes. It is ideal for beginner to intermediate riders, as the board is very responsive when you are learning new tricks or moves for the first time.
  • Available in multiple sizes: The Instigator is available in a range of sizes, starting at 140 and going to 160W. The size board you choose will depend on your weight. It is always best to consult the manufacturer’s snowboard sizing chart before you decide on the ideal size for your needs.
  • Manufacturer provides a three-year warranty: It is very comforting that you get a three-year warranty from Burton on this Instigator snowboard. As you learn the sport, you will know that most damage can be repaired through the warranty.

Cons

While many label the Burton Instigator as the best available board for beginners, it is not a flawless product. We have highlighted three cons of this snowboard that you should keep in mind before you finalize your purchase.

  • May have too much flex: If you are a freerider who is moving from an intermediate to advanced level, then you will find the flex on this board is too much. It will not give you the type of stability that you need to bomb slopes at speed or to ride in an aggressive way.
  • Not ideal for riding switch or park riding: If you enjoy attempting tricks such as riding switch, or you want to ride in the park then you may find this board is not suitable. The tapered tail means that it is harder to make the types of adjustments you need to ensure that you are performing tricks safely.
  • Not made in the United States: Many of Burton’s snowboards are made in the U.S. If you are someone who cares about buying products made domestically, then you may want to find an alternative. But even though it is made in China, this board is built with quality materials and has no durability concerns.

Comparison

 

Burton Instigator SnowboardBurton Instigator Snowboard

Loaded Boards Algernon SnowboardLoaded Boards Algernon Snowboard

Burton Process Flying V SnowboardBurton Process Flying V Snowboard

PriceCheck PriceCheck PriceCheck Price
typeFreeride, all-mountain All-mountainFreeride, freestyle, all-mountain
ability levelBeginner / intermediate Advanced / expertIntermediate / advanced
size145 to 165150 to 160155 to 162
colorBlue, red, blackBlue, bambooGreen, gray, black
shapeDirectionalTwinTwin
flexTwinTwinTwin
flex rateSoftMedium / stiff Soft / medium
coreFSC certified super fly 800GBamboo coreFSC certified super fly II 700G
sidecutRadial RadialModified
baseSinteredSintered UHMWSintered
fiberglassBiaxTriaxSintered
camberTraditionalMustacheTraditional
mountingChannel2 x 4Channel
weight12 lbs10 lbs12 lbs
warranty3 years1 year3 years

Summary

With twin flex and an FSC Certified Super Fly 800G core, the Instigator is very beginner friendly.

The Burton Instigator Snowboard is a top quality board that will be useful to beginner and intermediate riders. It is an all-mountain snowboard that is stylish in design, features a flat top and has a directional shape.

With twin flex and an FSC Certified Super Fly 800G core, the Instigator is very beginner friendly. Not only is it comfortable enough for a beginner to handle, but it has the necessary versatility to help you train in a range of riding styles.

If you want to invest in a quality board for the first couple years of your snowboarding journey, the Instigator is among the best Burton snowboards for the job. It is a reliable, durable and high performance option that will never let you down.


Burton Clash Snowboard

Burton Clash Snowboard
(rated 4.4 / 5)
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Still buzzing over your first experience with snowboarding? If you are interested in learning the sport, investing in a quality snowboard is so important.

With a reliable board that is geared towards beginners, you can shorten your learning curve and get comfortable with snowboarding.

The type of board that you buy will depend on your riding style, weight and experience.

A beginner should not be investing in an advanced board, as it will be too difficult to control.

But a high quality board that has the necessary flex, turning capability and reliability will make it much easier to learn this winter sport.

Information

Burton has designed and built the Clash model specifically for riders that want to have fun on the slopes while improving their fundamentals.

Anyone who has snowboarded one or two times wants to buy their own cool snowboard they can ride during the winter season. And it is not just about looking stylish with your very own board, but making it easier to learn the mechanics of the sport.

Investing in a high quality, durable board such as the Burton Clash Snowboard can make all the difference when you are mastering the basics and attempting tricks for the first time. It has a soft and playful personality, meaning it’s easy to control and turn on the slopes.

The Clash features a simple flat top design, which is ideal for beginners. It also has a slight taper that varies between 3 to 6mm depending on the size of the board that you purchase. The taper helps keep you pointed in the correct direction while snowboarding.

typeFreeride, all-mountain
ability levelBeginner / intermediate
size145 to 164
colorBlue, gray, black
shapeDirectional
flexTwin
flex rateSoft
coreFSC certified super fly 800G
sidecutRadial
baseSintered
fiberglassBiax
camberTraditional
mountingChannel
weight12 lbs
warranty3 years

Burton has designed and built the Clash model specifically for riders that want to have fun on the slopes while improving their fundamentals. It has a much smaller learning curve, compared to some advanced boards that your friends may be riding.

The board is also compatible with any bindings, not just the ones sold by Burton. It is recommended that you visit a professional shop to get them fitted, as there can be some issues with loose bindings because they were improperly attached by the rider.

If you want to invest money in a reliable board that will last you a few years, as you learn to snowboard and have fun on the slopes, then you cannot go wrong with a Burton Clash.

Pros

The combination of a softer flex, wooden core, Biax React fiberglass and other features ensure that controlling this board is very easy, even for complete beginners.

For new riders, the Clash is among the best Burton snowboards for sale today. It is geared towards beginner and intermediate riders, while it is made by a company with a stellar reputation. Here are the six best features of this snowboard.

  • Made with a wood core: Solid wood provides the durability and pop that you need in a beginner snowboard. The wood Burton uses is FSC certified, which indicates the wood originates from a responsibly managed forest.
  • Features an EZ V rocker: The EZ V rocker offers a catch-free and very forgiving riding experience. You get a lot of edge control with this model, while the board has more float and a very “easy to control” feeling when you are riding on the slopes.
  • It is flat top snowboard with a taper: Flat top boards are among the easiest to control, especially when turning. And the 3-6mm taper, depending on the size you select, will ensure that you are always pointed in the right direction.
  • Very easy for newbies to control: The combination of a softer flex, wooden core, Biax React fiberglass and other features ensure that controlling this board is very easy, even for complete beginners. It will make the tough task of becoming a seasoned snowboarder a lot easier than if you were riding a rental.
  • Available in different sizes: The sizes on this snowboard range from 139 to 164W. It is important to consult Burton’s snowboard sizing guide before you make a purchase, as a rider’s weight plays a big role in the size of board they need.
  • Comes with a three year warranty: As is the case with its other models, Burton provides a three-year manufacturer’s warranty when you buy a Clash snowboard. It is a policy that delivers peace of mind to the buyer, and three years is more than most other manufacturers offer.

Cons

Among the many snowboards for beginners, Burton’s Clash stands out as a top choice, plus it is a much better option than constantly paying for snowboard rentals each time you head to the slopes with friends. But there are three product cons that you should know about.

  • Experienced riders will not enjoy the ride: Because of the flat top design, tapering and the high flex, this board is specifically geared towards beginner and early intermediate riders. When you get beyond that stage, which can happen in a couple years of training, you will need to invest in another board.
  • If you are going at a high speed, it can be a little unstable: When you are going at a high speed down the slopes, you need a stiff board that can handle that type of force. The flex on this board is too much to handle high speeds.
  • There are some issues with the bindings: It can be very challenging to get the bindings properly attached to this board, and they can also come loose if not attached in the right way. Thankfully, it is an issue that you can rectify by visiting a professional ski or snowboard shop for board servicing.

Comparison

 

Burton Clash SnowboardBurton Clash Snowboard

Loaded Boards Algernon SnowboardLoaded Boards Algernon Snowboard

Burton Process Flying V SnowboardBurton Process Flying V Snowboard

PriceCheck PriceCheck PriceCheck Price
typeFreeride, all-mountain All-mountainFreeride, freestyle, all-mountain
ability levelBeginner / intermediate Advanced / expertIntermediate / advanced
size145 to 164150 to 160155 to 162
colorBlue, gray, blackBlue, bambooGreen, gray, black
shapeDirectionalTwinTwin
flexTwinTwinTwin
flex rateSoftMedium / stiff Soft / medium
coreFSC certified super fly 800GBamboo coreFSC certified super fly II 700G
sidecutRadialRadialModified
baseSinteredSintered UHMWSintered
fiberglassBiaxTriaxSintered
camberTraditionalMustacheTraditional
mountingChannel2 x 4Channel
weight12 lbs10 lbs12 lbs
warranty3 years1 year3 years

Summary

It is among the best snowboards for icy conditions, especially if you are learning the sport.

Learning how to snowboard can feel like an overwhelming experience, even if you are a generally athletic and adventurous person. The Burton Clash Snowboard will make your life so much easier, as it is the type of board that is perfect for beginners.

It is among the best snowboards for icy conditions, especially if you are learning the sport. It has a flat top and a 3-6mm taper, ensuring that you will be stable during your ride and able to turn easily.

Burton has a reputation for making some of the best snowboards for all skill levels. Their advanced boards are as impressive as the beginner models like the Clash. If you want to invest in a snowboard for the first few years of learning this sport, you cannot go wrong with this model.

Best Snowboard Buying Guide

All-mountain, freestyle, freeride, and other styles

The versatility of all mountain snowboards is for the majority of snowboarders, especially beginners, on groomed mountains, backcountry or experimenting with park and pipe. They’re either “directional” for downhill only or “twin-tip” for riding switch (switching which foot is leading).

Freestyle snowboards are short, flexible and twin-tip. They’re not the best snowboard for hardpack, but perfect for terrain parks, doing jumps, and tricks. The best freeride snowboards are excellent for downhill exploration of mountains, and the best powder snowboards also manage hard snow.

Beginner, intermediate, or advanced

Ability level enters into choosing the right snowboard, bindings, and boots. Beginners benefit from the best all mountain snowboard to try various terrains. Beginners should keep in mind that shorter length boards are easier to master.

Intermediates are comfortable on terrain that’s not too steep, can handle Blue runs and occasional Black runs. Carving is starting to be natural; you may have tried small jumps. Advanced riders turn smoothly at high speeds, enjoy steep terrain and carving, land most jumps, and ride switch. Black runs are normal.

Flex and feel of the ride

The feel of a snowboard is important to most riders. Boards flex two different ways – along the length which is the more important one, and across the width of the board. Soft flex boards are easier to turn and usually preferred by beginners and low-weight riders.

Stiffer boards give better grip when turning and hold their speed better than soft flex boards. But stay away from really stiff boards which are hard to control at slow speeds. Manufacturers list flex ratings ranging from soft to stiff.

Shape of the board

Need snowboard shapes explained? You’re not alone. Shape is tied into flex. Directional boards are designed for riding one way all over the mountain – downhill. The flex is different in the nose than it is in the tail.

Then there’s twin shape. It’s completely symmetrical; nose and tail are the same length and width. Likewise, the flex pattern is the same in nose and tail. You can ride them switch (forward or backward) and they’re great for park and pipe riding.

Width of the board

Board width affects control and turning. Wider boards can make it harder to initiate turns and it’s frustrating when the board doesn’t do what you want. But if a board is too narrow, your boots overhang and catch in the snow when turning – ending with skidding or a wipeout.

This is especially true for large feet. A general rule is that your feet will approximately cover the width of the board. If you wear men’s size 11 or bigger, you’ll likely need a wide board.

Length of the board

Sizing is based on the snowboarder’s weight, but that’s not all you need to consider. Most manufacturers provide recommended weight ranges for various size boards. Height, riding style, personal preference, and ability level play a part too.

These are no predetermined rules. Freestylers may prefer shorter boards for extra maneuverability. Tall people with slim builds may not need as much length as a heavier person the same height. Powder lovers will like longer boards since they cut through snow better.

Construction and core

At the center of the board is the core, probably the most important part. It’s most commonly made of wood like birch, bamboo, or poplar. Directly over the core is a fiberglass composite which provides stiffness, strength, and allows the board to bend.

Steel inserts are added where the bindings need to be attached, and metal edges run along the edges of a snowboard. This causes the board to dig into snow when you’re making turns. A plastic base and top layer complete the board.

Type of fiberglass used

Two basic types of fiberglass are used in snowboards: biax and triax. Biax is composed of fibers woven together at 90-degree angles. This type provides more torsional flex. In triax fiberglass, three layers are woven at 45, 45, and 0 degrees.

A snowboard made this way is stiffer and more responsive. Some environmentally-conscious brands use basalt for top sheets. These tend to be pricier, and have higher tensile strength than fiberglass. The result is usually a lighter and stronger board.

Extruded vs. sintered base

Two different types of bases, extruded and sintered, are used for making snowboard bases. Polyethylene is a durable thermoplastic that’s used for this because it’s abrasion resistant, is low friction, and dense.

Extruded bases are the cheaper of the two. Extruded bases are considered low maintenance and are pretty easy to repair if you get a ding. The most common risk is warping. Sintered bases are more expensive and require waxing throughout the season. They’re also lighter, faster, and tend to be more durable.

Camber or profile

Similar to the flex of a board, the camber varies based on the rider’s preferences. Regular camber (center and ends are off the ground when it’s lying flat) is responsive on hardpack and groomed areas. Experienced, fast riders like these.

Flat or neutral camber gives a stable ride and may be best for beginners. Reverse camber (or rocker) has upturned tips and tails – great for powder and riding rails in the park. Mixed camber has really grown in popularity in recent years.

Deep versus shallow sidecut

Snowboarding is all about making turns and the snowboard’s sidecut controls your movements. The sidecut is the concave middle section of a board that allows turns. Think of it as the “waist” of the board.

Measurements of sidecuts are usually on a spec sheet or on manufacturer websites. The shape, size, and profile determine how the board turns and performs on the snow. Tighter radial sidecuts allow for sharper, more abrupt turns than a board with a larger radial sidecut.

Weight of the board

By nature of materials used to make snowboards, they tend to be lightweight. Fiberglass is a main component and is lighter than many other mediums. Snowboard bindings are actually one of the heavier parts of your gear.

Without bindings, many boards are in the range of 10 to 15 pounds. One time that weight will matter is when you’re flying to other destinations to snowboard. Check beforehand with your airlines to find out weight limits on bags. Boots alone weigh quite a bit.

Mounting of the bindings

Once you’ve landed on a board you want, bindings need to be purchased separately. They come in different sizes, so make sure you get the right size for your foot. It’s extremely important to get bindings compatible with the board you select.

Bindings often come with multiple base plates, making them compatible with most board s. Setting up bindings is easier than it sounds, but to find the best snowboard bindings for beginners you may want a sales specialist to help with your selection.

Color and graphics

At this point, you’re down to the fun part of your selection. You’ve narrowed down your selection to those boards that will match how you want to ride, but now you can explore the tons of cool graphics to enjoy.

The top layer, or topsheet, of a snowboard is more than just a display, though. It protects the board and is usually of two types, glossy or matte. The graphics on glossy topsheets are usually embedded and matte topsheet graphics are typically screened on.

Warranty

Warranties for snowboards vary. They’re not going to cover the normal wear and tear which is normal for aggressive sports like snowboarding, but they will protect you against any defects in materials or workmanship. Hold on to receipts. Many warranties are for 1 to 3 years.

Expensive boards are not always better. High-end boards may include pricey materials for added stiffness, and less fun when you’re starting out or learning tricks. It’s most important to get the best snowboard for your personal enjoyment.

Loaded Boards Algernon Snowboard
Our pick for the best snowboard is: Loaded Boards Algernon Snowboard. This choice was made after spending 39 hours researching snowboards.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the most important features on a snowboard?

It’s crucial to define your snowboarding style before choosing equipment. The board, binding and boot choices are influenced by what your style is. For example, do you want the best carving snowboards or the best value all mountain snowboard?

Having a board that is great for doing tricks isn’t going to make you happy if all you want to do is ride through the backcountry. Directional snowboards that are great for downhill only won’t be any good for riding switch.

Should beginners get a different board than advanced snowboarders?

Most agree that the best beginner snowboard is the all-mountain style, which also happens to be what the majority of snowboarders use. It’s very versatile so you can try out all kinds of rides until you decide what terrain and conditions you like best.

Other things to keep in mind if you’re just starting out: a slightly shorter board is easier to learn on, and a flat (neutral) cambered board will give you a more stable ride until you grow in skill.

Do women need different boards than men use?

Most guidelines for choosing a board are based on weight first and then other considerations. But you’ll often see women’s models now on par with a matching men’s model. Women are built differently so it’s good to look at what can be best for each gender.

Usually, women weigh less than men of the same height so they can use a softer flex for more stability and easier control. Their feet are usually smaller too, so they can use a narrower board than men.

What type of snowboard is best for learning to do tricks?

Freestyle snowboards are short, flexible and are twin-tipped, so you can ride with either foot forward (“riding switch”). These are great for those who want to frequent the terrain parks, navigate jumps, and learn to do tricks. They won’t be great in hard packed snow, though.

A “noodle” board is yet another type, also known as a street or jib board. It’s the best choice if you want extreme flex for riding rails and boxes. Some who use noodle boards don’t even go to a ski park.

What are some tips for traveling with a snowboard and gear?

Snowboarders need to ask the same questions as a ski traveler about packing their gear. Skiers usually end up with a ski bag that holds skis, ski bindings, and ski poles, and a separate ski boots bag. That’s because the weight of ski boots may put a bag over the limit.

You can carry your snowboard boots on board if you’re in a bind with an airline’s weight limits. Check early to see what your airline recommends for packing sports equipment.

Loaded Boards Algernon Snowboard
Our pick for the best snowboard is: Loaded Boards Algernon Snowboard. This choice was made after spending 39 hours researching snowboards.

Sources

  1. Snowboard, Wikipedia
  2. What are the health hazards of snowboarding?, US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, Feb 17, 2001
  3. Snowboarding injuries: trends over time and comparisons with alpine skiing injuries, US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, Apr 4, 2012
  4. January is National Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month, Recreation.gov
  5. Burton Recalls Snowboard Boots Due to Fall Hazard, United States Consumer Product Safety Commission, Jul 11, 2018
  6. Snowboards, Transportation Security Administration
  7. List of snowboard tricks, Wikipedia
  8. Burton Backhill snowboard created by Jake Burton, The National Museum of American History
  9. How to Snowboard (with Pictures), wikiHow
  10. 10 Beginner Snowboard Skills - First Day Riding, YouTube, Dec 13, 2014

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